Autolyse question...


Hello,
Thank you for this great community! I am new here, but excited to contribute! I have a question…
I have been using the master Dough recipe with a poolish and have been pretty happy with the results. I would like to try an autolyse for tomorrows dough. In terms of doing this with a poolish, what is the best sequence to follow with the mixing?

Should it be:

Flour
Ice water
yeast dissolved in it's water
poolish
Autolyse
salt
oil

or perhaps some variation? Thanks in advance!
I was also thinking of mixing it all together (as in recipe) and covering it in fridge for 30 min for autolyse then taking it out to let it rise before balling…

Thank for feedback.

James F.
posted over 2 years ago

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Autolyse is a process developed by Prof. Raymond Calvel. You can read about it in his book "The taste of bread".

The Autolyse process involves ONLY flour and water, that's it. No yeast, no oil, no sugar, etc. It is used to thoroughly hydrate the flour. Normally an hour or two is sufficient.

Hope that helps.

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Mike K.
posted over 2 years ago

Thank's for the response Mike. So it is not possible to use this process with a poolish? I bring this up since the poolish contains a sizeable sum of the water called for in the recipe.

- James   over 2 years ago


I suppose I could use most of the water that is designated in recipe for dissolving yeast and combine that with the ice water. That may be enough. According to the Master Dough with starter recipe that would be around 60% hydration. Would that be enough for an effective autolyse? I could then dissolve my ADY in less water and add with poolish, the salt and finally oil. Does this seem feasible?

James F.
posted over 2 years ago


James,

The Master Dough w/starter has a hydration of 65%, not 60%. I would use all the ice water to do an autolyse and keep the yeast water on the side.

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Mike K.
posted over 2 years ago

Thanks Mike and sorry for being a pest. I just want to get this right. It seems to me that the 65% hydration is achieved after the poolish and the Yeast water is added back in. If one were to add just the flour and just the ice water in the recipe that would have more like A 45% hydration. Maybe I am missing something? This seems like it wouldn't be enough for an effective soak. I was thinking by reducing the amount of water used to dissolve the yeast that you could add it as additional ice water and achieve a higher hydration for a more effective soak. Then after add the poolish wish the reduced yeast water etc. does this seem like the best course?

- James   over 2 years ago

Give it a shot. Can't hurt,...it's all about trial and error.

- Mike   over 2 years ago

Thank you Mike, will do!

- James   over 2 years ago


I am not sure of the politics of directing to another site, but I have been investigating Autolyse and found a series of posts on the topic and have tried the techniques to learn a bit more, perhaps a read through topic by Gsans at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=25848.400
Would be informative for you, - hope so

Greg S.
posted over 2 years ago

Thank you for the link Greg. I will read it this evening and try and gleam some good info from it!

- James   over 2 years ago

Hi Greg, no politics here. I haven't posted an official community policy since everyone here is great and there hasn't been a need for one. That said, if the link is appropriate and relevant to the topic at hand, then there's no issue.

If it's an attempt driving sales or traffic to another site, then it's frowned up and the links will be removed.

- Raj   over 2 years ago


Welcome James! A great question. For some of my dough formulations, I do something similar to an autolyse. To hydrate my dough, I take my water/yeast mixture and add the same amount of flour to the mixing bowl. Using the paddle attachment, I mix it for a brief period until a batter is formed.

you can probably do something similar with your recipe.

Baking and pizza making are precise crafts, but there is a fair amount of flexibility for certain steps.

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted over 2 years ago

Thanks Raj, I wasn't sure on protocol
On that site, I recounted trying an Autolyse of 14.5 hrs with good success, 100% water 50% flour as suggested by the thread "owner", I have no association, apart that we are both named Greg, my posts there are as Icelandr. I mention the post because I think it useful, especially if someone is looking for info on Autolyse. Someday all this searching will help me build a better neopolitan pizza, I have time, just not quite there yet

- Greg   over 2 years ago

Thank you Raj! Good idea… Would you then add remaining flour and poolish on top and mix it all? I guess it won't get the benefits of a long autolyse but maybe hydrate a bit better..

- James   over 2 years ago

That's correct. After mixing water/yeast and flour initially and letting it rest, you add the remaining flour and then mix.

- Raj   over 2 years ago

Raj, I am curious - does one add the yeast before the Autolyse or after. If you extend the period of autolosis the yeast will be working the whole time rather than soaking and conditioning the flour. I have not used the method for bread which may well be the same.
Thanks

- Greg   over 2 years ago

Greg, I'm not Raj but if you add the yeast before you cannot technically call it an autolyse.

If the yeast is added before it automatically starts the fermentation process. Add the yeast after the autolyse and then mix the other ingredients in with it.

Hope that helps a little.

- Mike   over 2 years ago

That is why I asked - see Raj's reply above

- Greg   over 2 years ago


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