Baking steels vs. Pizza stones. Which is better?


I'm familiar with pizza stones, but not baking steels. In recent days, I've been hearing more about baking steels. What's the difference between the two and is one better than the other for certain uses?

Marcos F.
posted almost 3 years ago

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I own both and although both can make great pizza, I've fallen in love with the baking steels.
They conduct the heat so evenly and work perfectly when I'm baking or broiling pizzas. I've seen it suggested that you could use the back of a sheet pan. No! It will never produce the same crust and will probably warp the pan. The baking steels come in a storage case, and although heavy, they are much easier to store. Although it's expensive to buy 2 of them, they will be forever. No worry about chipping or breaking.

Susie H.
posted almost 3 years ago


I was just on the Kelly & Michael show live and we had to make 5 regional pizzas from a very standard almost sub par home oven. I had two aking steels delivered to me for the show. I have used stones and steels before especially during the process and tests for The Pizza Bible and what really showed was the recovery time the steels had when making pizzas right after each other. I really could tell when we had the pressure of a live show to get pizzas out one right after each other that the Baking Steels were so great. Like the other post they are virtually indestructible and easy to clean. They are definitely my pick for a cooking surface for your home oven

Tony Gemignani admin
posted almost 3 years ago


I'm wondering if some brands of steels are better than others?

I bought a steel from 'Nerd Chef' and am VERY disappointed in their product and customer service.

I've tried using the steel several times on different shelf positions in the oven. From the bottom shelf being bottom heated, to the top shelf being broiler (top heating), and every shelf space in between.
Each time I used the steel, even after several minutes of cooking, the pizza looked raw (the steel was pre-heated for more than 90 minutes at 550 F, and the infra-red thermometer showed a surface temp of 620+ F).

I've had much better results using my stone under the same conditions.

Maybe it's that brand of steel, maybe it isn't. Since my pizzas get cooked very nicely with a stone, I know it's not a problem with the oven.

Tory Glenn
posted over 1 year ago

Adam, I took your advice. I'll be getting a new steel from Bakingsteel.com.
We'll see how that goes.

- Tory   over 1 year ago

Your Baking Steel is on it's way Tory! Can't wait for your feedback....
Andris

- andris   over 1 year ago


I don't know the steel that you have, but the steel from bakingsteel.com is outstanding.

Adam Sachs
posted over 1 year ago

Thank you for the plug Adam. I am grateful...
Andris

- andris   over 1 year ago


Adam,

Ok, thanks. Good to know. I'll check into theirs.

Tory Glenn
posted over 1 year ago


Here is what I did.....I found a local industrial metal company and had them fabricate it for me. It was cheaper and better as I got the exact size that I wanted giving me a large landing area. Ask for A36 Steel. I had them make TWO 8 x 20 x 1/2" . The reason for two is one would be too heavy.

Kevin Z.
posted over 1 year ago


Adam Sachs, when you use that steel from Bakingsteel.com, do you use a particular shelf space in the oven you find works well?

Tory Glenn
posted over 1 year ago


Tory--I use the steel high in the oven, about a third from the top of the oven, and a stone pretty low in the oven. Every oven is different, and you should experiment with yours to see what works best. For what it's worth, I've found the best oven mitts to use if I'm moving the steel when it's hot are the red san jamar gloves. If you can't move the steel when it's hot, take photos of the pizzas when they're baked in different positions, and compare them.

Good luck!

Adam Sachs
posted over 1 year ago


Adam,
Ok, good to know. I find that when I use a stone in 'broiler' mode, it works very well. But that's on the very top shelf about 3" below the broiler coils.

I was told by someone that there's some 'rule' about that if the steel is too close to the broiler coils, the steel won't work as well.

I will do some experimenting to see which method works best.

Thanks,

Tory

Tory Glenn
posted over 1 year ago


Love the Modernist steel. The heat retention is excellent!

Medium dsci0016

John Paul Khoury
posted over 1 year ago


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