caputo not spotty


Hi Gents

The first 25kg bag of Caputo flour I bought used to go that nice spotty brown color, I've since had another 2 bags and I can't seem the get the same results. It just browns evenly! Does anyone know what factor makes the base spotty or could this be a different batch of flour I've got?

Mike R
posted over 2 years ago

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Got oven to 450 degrees and it's now spotty.

@thefoodfurnace

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Mike R
posted over 2 years ago


Looks great Mike. What was the bake time?

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted over 2 years ago


This was about 1 min. Was really fast. Normally have the oven just under 400, 380-90

Mike R
posted over 2 years ago


Very nice. I'm not used to Celsius units. Looks amazing. High temperature is key with Caputo flour.

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted over 2 years ago


Few other pizzas, not spotty but still good.

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Mike R
posted over 2 years ago


Mike,

Those look excellent.

I think the reason you don't get much leoparding is because your temps are too low. You're baking at 400°C/750°F. Try to hit 485°C/900°F. You might have to make some slight adjustments with your formula and/or the way you ferment the dough.

I'm wondering if you "dome" the pies close to the end of the bake.

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Mike K.
posted over 2 years ago

You also might want to look through his slideshow. He's a home pizzamaker in Texas and produces outstanding Neapolitan pies.

http://www.lindbergs.us/

- Mike   over 2 years ago


Hi Mike

Normally we do bit of doming but with the margarita Neapolitan style we had the oven at 450 about 900f and it was cooking so quick we didn't bother. Next time we will try taking it off the floor sooner and doming as the base was starting to get a bit more charred.

Thanks for info

Mike R
posted over 2 years ago


There are other reasons to improve on leapording
1. Longer maturation. A 48hr dough will lepord more than a 24Hr dough (how old is your dough?
2. Oven needs to be hotter- how long are you firing it before using it? (what type of wood are you using)is the size of that wood sufficent for the size of your oven!
3Where are you placing your pies in your oven? May not be the right place. To me
Your oven doesn't look hot enough. Guns don't matter. They bother me actually so if your telling me your bottom is 900 that doesn't matter. Time is a factor and did you light the oven the day and night before cooking in it?? Very important.
4 higher hydration will help. All flours absorption rate changes through the year and is never consistent. Adding more water will help

Tony Gemignani admin
posted over 2 years ago


Hi Tony

Thanks for the info.

Out dough is at least 36 hours.

Our oven has been fired for around 1 hour. The oven we are using is a bespoke oven for food events, designed to heat up in 30/40 mins. It's mobile so we need it this way so it heats and cools quickly. We use a hard wood, kiln dried half logs then chopped into another 3 or 4 pieces, so fairly small but allowing the oven to be brought back up to temp quickly. No lighting the day before. Would have no residual heat even if we did due to the fast cooling.

We use one of them thermal laser guns to check temps, placing the pizza at the back left hand side of oven. Oven floor and oven around 380c-400c (800f)

Will try more hydration we are currently 60%

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Mike R
posted over 2 years ago

Try increasing the hyrdration to 65%. It'll be noticeably wetter than 60%, but it should help with the leoparding.

- Raj   over 2 years ago


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