Ciao from Sicily!!


Ciao everybody,
Been using and comparing The Pizza Bible recipes to a bunch of other recipes I have and am finding a trend. Im finding all of the Pizza Bible recipes to be limp and flat compared to others. Im guessing that this is because most of my other recipes use more yeast. Am I right on this guess? I use the same stand mixer, wood oven and/or conventional oven, flour, yeast, water, etc for all the recipes when Im comparing them. The Pizza Bible recipes are pretty tasty, but I still feel like Im missing something. Grazie for any ideas.

The pictures are of my pride and joy wood oven that I got out here in Sicily. Goes up to 500 degrees C (932 deg F)! By the way Sicilians mainly eat normal round pizzas not the rectangles. Not sure where the whole pan pizza association came from.hahaha

Medium dsc 0292

Medium dsc 0300

Medium img 0076

Medium img 0083

Medium img 0091

nick L.
posted about 2 years ago

Save 0

Welcome Nick! That's a beautiful pizza, and a beautiful oven.

As far as flatness of pizza goes, if I had to guess it's more to do with shaping and technique than the recipe alone. The recipes I've made from the Pizza Bible tend to be generous with yeast, use pre-ferments (e.g. Poolish, Biga) and call for a decent hydration point. I've been able to achieve a nice crumb and puffy rim. Also, oven temperature is another factor.

Which recipes did you make from The Pizza Bible? And what kind dough is used in the pictures you posted?

Thumb raji
Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


Thanks for the response Raj! So far Ive done the Detroit (former native), margherita, master with, master without, and tonight I did the Sicilian + a foccacia. The pizza pictured was a same day dough recipe. With tonight's pizzas I compared the Sicilian from Pizza Bible(with starter) to a Sicilian from Cooks Illustrated. Both required about 2 days. I could tell right away the difference with the doughs. The Cooks Illustrated one almost filled up the large container from the expansion, whereas the PB was about half the size. The resulting cooked dough was similar in that the Cooks illustrated had a nicer fluff to it. For this one it may be the addition of Semolina flour in the recipe, which is more authentic in Sicily. Here is the recipe for comparison.. hopefully the link works.. thoughts?: https://www.cooksillustrated.com/recipes/8256-thick-crust-sicilian-style-pizza

nick L.
posted about 2 years ago


Nick,

I'm wondering how the increased amount of yeast in your recipes affects the fermentation/retardation times? I could imagine that more yeast will speed all that up unless you keep it very chilled during the two-day period.

Thumb t1
Mike K.
posted about 2 years ago

Ciao Mike. I do keep them in the fridge during the 2 days. Maybe its too cold in there?

- nick   about 2 years ago


I've seen the Cooks Illustrated Sicilian recipe in the print edition but haven't tried it. The link requires a subscription, so I can't see the details, but going off memory, I remember there being a few things about the procedure/recipe that struck me as odd.

I'll try it this week, and report back since the recipe I use is very similar to the one in The Pizza Bible.

Regarding fluff, I remember the one in Cooks Illustrated having a very closed crumb structure and appearing very dense. The Pizza Bible recipe calls for a fairly high hydration and has a very open crumb structure.

Thumb raji
Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


Your pizza looks fantastic. What are the toppings you used?

Thumb 548946 10151148645663883 1019394008 n  1
Aleksander J.
posted almost 2 years ago

Thanks Aleksander! The top picture is topped with thinly sliced potatoes, mozzarella, sauteed leeks, goat cheese, and pancetta(bacon). Molto buono! It kind of tastes like a loaded baked potato... if your into that you should try it out.

- nick   almost 2 years ago


Thanks, I know how my saturday's pizza is gonna look like:-)

Thumb 548946 10151148645663883 1019394008 n  1
Aleksander J.
posted almost 2 years ago


I'm augmenting a poolish made with a 30 year old starter with a little dry yeast and have exceptional results. Great depth of flavor. Also enough salt to heighten the flavor. I find 'flat' doughs needs more salt from the get go.

John Paul Khoury
posted almost 2 years ago

Wish i had a 30 year old starter!! haha.. Thanks for the salt tip

- nick   almost 2 years ago


Hey Nick,

Your pizza tastes delicious! I tried it yesterday and here's the result. Thanks!

Best regards,
Olek

Thumb 548946 10151148645663883 1019394008 n  1
Aleksander J.
posted almost 2 years ago

Glad it turned out! dont see the pic though.

- nick   almost 2 years ago


Hey,

sorry, didn't attached.

Thumb 548946 10151148645663883 1019394008 n  1
Aleksander J.
posted almost 2 years ago


Hey,

sorry, didn't attached.

Thumb 548946 10151148645663883 1019394008 n  1
Aleksander J.
posted almost 2 years ago


Hey,

sorry, i didn't attached somehow. Here you are. What do you think?

Thumb 548946 10151148645663883 1019394008 n  1
Aleksander J.
posted almost 2 years ago


Hey,

sorry, i didn't attached somehow. Here you are. What do you think?

https://goo.gl/photos/fiNZxraWxEe7wsiL9

Thumb 548946 10151148645663883 1019394008 n  1
Aleksander J.
posted almost 2 years ago


Sign In to reply to this post