Crust too tough and chewy


First off, I would like to thank you for your book! I started watching Tony's videos on making pizzas a couple of years ago (mostly because I was interested in tossing dough) and now that he's got a second book out, it's just wonderful!

I very successfully made the master dough with starter a couple weekends ago and that turned out just great using the two stone method (actually, I have one steel and one stone at the moment). However, when I tried a different recipe using the two stone method, the crust was not as crisp and almost too tough. My question is, in general, what causes the crust to be too tough or chewy once the pizza is baked? I'm sure there are multiple reasons for this, but I'm just wondering if there is a most common reason to target first. Is it more due to the type of flour, the percentages, or maybe extra ingredients? The recipes were pretty different and I'm going to take a closer look at the percentages and how they compare with Tony's recipe.

The learning is the second best part of the process. The BEST part is the enjoying the pizzas ... even the bad ones!

Thank you.

Marty B.
posted almost 3 years ago

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Thanks for the question. Let's first start with - What flour did you use?

Tony Gemignani admin
posted almost 3 years ago


I used King Arthur Bread Flour, and the hydration was about the same as your master dough with starter recipe.

Marty B.
posted almost 3 years ago


I perfer KA Sir Lancelot flour. Did you use my malt or a browning agent? Sounds like you dough took too long to brown making it tough or you may have over mixed your dough which can make your dough tough. What temp were you cooking at? Hydration is important but the tough and chewy part may be because of the flour, mix time, temp of oven, or not enough browning agent.. Let me know. Thanks

Tony Gemignani admin
posted almost 3 years ago


I have the Sir Lancelot flour as well (which is what I used in your master dough recipe), but wanted to try the regular bread flour. I did not use any malt, but did use semolina thinking it would help make a crisper crust. The recipe I was trying also called for sugar to be used in the dough. What are the pros and cons to using sugar? I noticed that you don't use sugar in your recipes. Over kneading is a possibility because I noticed that when I was mixing the dough it was a little bit lumpier than normal. Not much, but enough to notice at least, so I tried to get the rough spots smoothed out. I was cooking at 500 degrees. I also let the dough sit for an hour before balling it, like your master dough without starter recommends. Then I put the dough balls in the refrigerator in a dough mate proofing box overnight. When I made the pizzas I let the dough balls warm up to about 60-65 as you direct in your book.

Marty B.
posted almost 3 years ago


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