Dough is too elastic!


Hey, Guys--

I've fixed my problem of the dough being too sticky (reduced water content).

Now, my issue is the dough will not retain its shape when forming. It's like trying to stretch a rubber band and expecting it to stay stretched. This makes it nearly impossible, for me, to form a circular dough. My pizzas have the funkiest shapes, but dough browns beautifully and tastes wonderful (kudos to Tony for that).

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

Jay

Jay G.
posted about 3 years ago

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What is your general workflow, start to finish?

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Mike K.
posted about 3 years ago

Hi, Mike. The workflow is exactly what is outlined in The Pizza Bible, with one exception: I hold back a little more water than two tablespoons due to the humidity here in South Florida.

Maybe I just haven't mastered the art of stretching the dough. What might I be missing?

- Jay   about 3 years ago


HI Jay: It sounds like your dough needs to rest. If it's rested when you begin to stretch it and it won't stretch out, cover it with parchment & towel and let the gluten relax. It should be okay when you go back. Is the dough room temperature? Is your surface room temp? I think a surface that is too cold might also cause a problem.

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Maria .
posted about 3 years ago

Hello, Maria. The dough is taken out of the fridge after 48 hours and allowed to come to room temperature--between 60 to 90 minutes. I (try to) shape the dough on the flour-dusted kitchen counter top (it's quartz, similar to marble). Once I've done as much damage as possible, I transfer the dough to the dusted peel and try one last time to stretch it out a little more before adding toppings.

- Jay   about 3 years ago


Hi Jay: That's funny because I usually have the opposite experience. Mine is sometimes too dead and doesn't snap back after such a long time in the fridge. I think after a certain point, the yeast doesn't have enough to feed on, or it's over-risen.

Is your kitchen warm or cold? Did you take the temperature of your dough? It s/b between 60-65 degrees. Have you tried pushing out the dough on a warmer surface like a wood cutting board? I believe that the water and the salt quantity can affect the texture of the dough. What kind of water are you using?

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Maria .
posted about 3 years ago


The ambient temperature in the kitchen is about 75 degrees, give or take a degree (probably warmer with the oven on at 500 degrees for an hour). Usually, the dough is between 65-70 degrees when I start working with it.

The water is filtered. I thought salt retarded the yeast. That doesn't seem to be my problem in the least.

Jay G.
posted about 3 years ago


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