Dry tiga, dry dough?


First I want to let you know I bake a ton of bread from starters, and I make tons of pizza ( I only bake my own bread, and use the Italian baker book quite a bit). I have 6 kids, so I always double or triple recipes. I made the tiga and it was very thick, like a regular pizza dough, so I added an extra 2/3 c water to get it to the consistency a tiga should be. In addition, the dough was very, very dry and I had to add an additional cup of water. Also while making the master recipe I had to add 1/2 c extra water. Is anyone else having this problem? I live in the desert but have never had to add this much extra water before. I am using the King Arthur high gluten flour. Any suggestions? Thanks!!!

Anne G.
posted about 2 years ago

Save 0

Do you weigh your ingredients? The tiga's consistency is similar to a medium wet dough, like the Sicilian. If you're using volume measures, you can easily end up with too much flour, and that would make the toga seem much more like a stiff starter. Take a look both at pages 8 (about weighing ingredients) and 19 (relativity) for some really helpful insights.

Adam Sachs
posted about 2 years ago


I second Adam's suggestion: weigh your ingredients, preferably using grams instead of ounces. It's also worth double checking the numbers and writing them out when scaling recipes. I often cut recipes in half and find myself almost making trivial math mistakes.

Thumb raji
Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


I did weigh everything in grams. It has been dry here in Phoenix, so I'm sure that is playing a part of this. Usually the polish recipes I use are extremely wet, and the hydration ratio is much higher. I went ahead and used the dough and the pizza turned out great but the dough was tough to handle. I did triple the recipe (6 kids and 2 are teenaged boys....so you can guess how much they can put away!). The dough seemed a bit dry and not very workable. I'm going to try this again and use 00 flour instead of the KA Sir Lancelot. Does anyone have any pictures of how the tiga should look? I am going to make this again and I will take some pictures. Maybe the flour change will help. Some of the pictures others have posted show a very wet dough and mine was just the opposite, so I was concerned that it wouldn't turn out. It did, but now I'm wondering about the flavor and texture of the dough. Thanks for your suggestions!

Anne G.
posted about 2 years ago


Anne, I'll be making some Tiga this afternoon. I'll be sure to snap a picture and post it to this thread.

In terms of weather, it will affect the dough, but it shouldn't be too dramatic. If anything it will affect fermentation times.

If I recall, the Master Dough formulation is around 62-65% hydration. That is, 62 grams of water for every 100 grams of flour. This amount isn't considered too wet, but it's certainly not dry. Aside from tripling, did you use the same amounts in the recipe?

Thumb raji
Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


I did. When I'm making a recipe for the first time I am very strict with following the instructions. The dough did not come together and was very ragged so I added water until it came together. It cleared the bowl and the bowl was clean of all ingredients. The dough felt hard as opposed to pliable and workable (if that makes sense). Thanks for your help! I will make my tiga after I see your pictures to make sure that I'm on the right track!

Anne G.
posted about 2 years ago


Anne,

I think the tiga is much drier than the poolish. And your flour might be really dry. I adjust hydration from one bag of flour to the next, and it sounds like you're very experienced, so you should just add water until it seems about right. Good luck!

Adam Sachs
posted about 2 years ago


Just looked back at your post, and I wonder whether you might have used the tiga in a formula that calls for the poolish (which is much wetter). The dough sounds much drier than it should be. Do you know what the final hydration of your dough was?

Adam Sachs
posted about 2 years ago


I bake artisan bread weekly. I always bought KA flour with a preferment, including my 10 year old reliable, SD starter. About a year ago I noticed that the quality of King Arthur flour had changed. It handled differently. the dough had clumps that can only be described as wet cardboard. After researching flours, I switched to Great River Organic Milling.The flour is creamier in appearance; the bread, divine. I have yet to try it for pizza dough.

Diane S.
posted about 2 years ago


Diane,

Thank you for the suggestion on the flour! I will give the other a try. I bake artisan as well as sandwich loaves almost daily. I would love to elevate my bread! Thank you!!!!

Anne G.
posted about 2 years ago


Hi Anne,

I mentioned I would take pictures the next time I made a batch. Unfortunately, I realized you were referring to the Tiga. I typically make a poolish. The Tiga/Biga is going to be much drier since it has a hydration that's the same as a dough. Because of this, it will resemble a dough. I'll try the tiga later this week and post pics.

Raj

Thumb raji
Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


Are you using bottled or tap water? If your using tap is your water filtered? The dryness in weather does or can play a small role. I raise my hydration in Las Vegas slightly. Are you mixing long enough? Are you bench resting your dough? If so are you covering it with something? I hope so and If
you are in your area Which is dry I would with a damp cold cloth. That recipe works great even with a Biga and could have minor adjustments but nothing major. Sounds like something else is a problem

Tony Gemignani admin
posted about 2 years ago


Sign In to reply to this post