Flour blends


Anyone have a favorite blend that gets the softness of Caputo but has a higher protein level?

Gregory McCarty
posted about 2 years ago

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I would like that as well!
Anyone?

Ted Mathiesen
posted about 2 years ago


The Caputo/High gluten blend has served me well. It's not quite soft, but not tough either. It only works well in high temperature ovens though.

If you're going for softer maybe Caputo/Bread flour would be a mix to try.

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


I am used to using caputo blue and just got some of Tony's flour. I was pretty amazed at how much firmer the dough was and how much harder it was to stretch using the same recipe and technique for both. The flavor was great but it showed me what an amateur I am when it comes to different flours. I'm going to try a caputo/Tony's flour and a caputo/power flour blend next to see the results.

Gregory McCarty
posted about 2 years ago


Caputo blue and high gluten are at opposite ends of the spectrum in terms of protein content. If you want to get crazy, try All trumps or King Kaiser (highest protein flour available).

Protein content and hydration are two important factors when it comes to stretching dough.

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


If my protein count goes up do I increase my hydration? And I guess by how much?

Gregory McCarty
posted about 2 years ago


Spec sheets for Caputo Blue and Red...

http://caputoflour.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/00-Pizzeria-SPECS.pdf

http://caputoflour.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/00-Rinforzata-Flour-SPECS.pdf

Both have a good amount of protein levels. You can stretch it with a lower protein flower such as an AP from King Arthur. I'd start at a 60/40 level and work from there.

Is that for a home oven application or a professional oven?

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Mike K.
posted about 2 years ago


Testing a bunch of recipes and flours at home but are destined for a professional oven eventually.

Gregory McCarty
posted about 2 years ago


Home ovens and commercial ovens are two different animals. The dough you're making now at home may or may not work in a commercial oven.

I'd test it in a commercial oven first, perhaps in a rentable kitchen and see how it turns out.

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Mike K.
posted about 2 years ago


I'd suggest starting with middle of the road values for both hydration and blends. Something like 62% hydration and 50/50 Caputo/Bread flour or Caputo/High gluten.

Once you've done this, you should have a good sense of where you want to go. In a subsequent batch, you can adjust one variable such as hydration to see the effect and then course correct.

It's really important to isolate variables. As Mike mentioned, the way a dough performs can very greatly from oven to oven. You might find that you've perfected a dough for your home oven only to have it not work that well in a commercial oven.

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


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