Food Mill Adventure


Purchased basic manual food mill and gave it try. My hope was to make sauce for Neapolitan pizza.

Want to hear from the rest of the folks how you use it and your experience producing sauce with it.

Here is mine>

Took whole caned tomatoes and strained them. Hand crushed and remove hard parts. I then loaded them into food mill and started to crank. And crank and crank. Youtube food mill and crank some more. Felt like I was just pushing tomatoes around. More of the juice was pushed thru the mesh ( tried all 3 sizes ) but the meat was not pushed. Could be the cheap model I picked up.

Want to hear if you used one and your own experience. I am tempted to try my Omega 3000 juicer next time.

Roman

Roman K.
posted about 2 years ago

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I've had a fantastic experience with mine, and mine is the cheapest one out there. :-)

This is the model I have: http://www.amazon.com/Classic-Rotary-Style-Stainless-Blades/dp/B000F7JXM4/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1436838582&sr=8-4&keywords=food+mill

Here's how I make my San Marzano sauce with a food mill:

1. Open up a 28-ounce can of San Marzanos and pour into a fine-mesh strainer large enough to hold the contents. Place a bowl underneath the strainer. Poke the tomatoes repeatedly with a fork and let it strain for about 30-45 minutes.

2. Set aside the liquid that was strained. Usually it's about 6-8 ounces. A significant portion of the can.

3. Fit the food mill with the finest plate (you can the see the images on Amazon for example of what this means for my food mill). Pour the contents of the strainer into the food mill and place a large enough bowl underneath the mill.

4. Crank away. Make sure the tomatoes are getting under the blade. After a few turns, you'll want to push the remaining tomatoes around so that they go under the blade.

After all is said and done, about 6 ounces of the pulp will be left in the mill. This means about 12-14 ounces of sauce will be produced. Add salt to taste. If the texture is a little too thin, you can add one to two teaspoons of the pulp into the sauce to get a better texture.

Keep in mind that San Marzano sauce is supposed to be thin. It's not supposed to be a juice, but it's also a lot thinner than a "regular" pizza sauce. Hope this helps!

Thumb raji
Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


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