Latest attempt at Pizzeria Mozza Pizza


Here's my latest attempt at replicating the pizza from Pizzeria Mozza. For those that haven't heard of Mozza, it's joint venture between Mario Batali, Nancy Silverton and Joseph Bastianich. Mozza makes some of the most unique and memorable pizza I've tried. Most people who have it feel the same way.

At first glance, it's easy to look at the puffy rim and be turned off by it. I promise it's an amazing pizza. It's special in that it's a *very* high hydration dough: 85% to be exact. And unlike most doughs, it contains rye flour, barley malt syrup and wheat germ.

There's still some work to be done, but this was pretty close! The pizza pictured below was cooked at 650F and contains low-moisture mozzarella, Castelvetrano olives, chili flakes and heavy cream.

Medium 01 mozza

Medium 02 mozza

Medium 03 mozza

Medium 04 mozza

Medium 05 mozza

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted over 1 year ago

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looks awesome raj. musta been pretty hard to work with.

Jeff S.
posted over 1 year ago


Thanks Jeff. 85% is like pancake batter! It takes practice. It's not practical for most pizzerias to use a dough like this.

The book recipe required a few tweaks to come out right. A little more blistering on the dough, and it'll be on par with the restaurant.

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted over 1 year ago


That's nuts raj! You need to post a video of you working with the dough and stuff!

Jeff S.
posted over 1 year ago


Hey Raj,
what's so unique on pizza from Pizzeria Mozza?
Looks delicious :D

BTW: why did you put the Pizza on a Pizza sheet (pic where Pizza is in the oven)

Ulli Haus
posted over 1 year ago


Ulli, Mozza pizza is unique because of the hydration. at 85%, it's WAY higher than most places. Serious Pie in Seattle, WA is the only other place I know of that uses such a wet dough. The dough also uses wheat germ, barley malt syrup and rye flour which isn't common for pizzas. The other thing unique about Mozza dough is that the poolish is really really wet. Over 100% (more water than flour) and is over 50% weight of the final dough.

The screen is a nice little tool to keep the bottom of your pizza from burning. With some ovens, the ratio of top heat to bottom heat isn't optimal, and you end up with a bottom that finishes before the top does. The screen is a nice solution to this problem. I don't use this on all styles of pizzas or ovens. It really depends on what is going on.

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted over 1 year ago


Hi Raj,
thanks for clarifying :)

I recently made a pie with 80% water plus 2.5% oil.
This dough was a mess to work with but since I used it in a Chicago deep dish, it didn't matter.

That screen is also a great idea to get the pie into the oven - which I imagin becomes close to impossible @ this hydration level.

Ulli Haus
posted over 1 year ago


Hi Raj,

It would be great if you can share the exact ingredients and some information on the preparation.
Also what is the final dough size? (I mean a single ball).

Thanks in advance,
Francesco

Francesco L.
posted over 1 year ago


Hi Francesco,

Here's the recipe. It's exactly the same as the book recipe: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/10/nancy-silvertons-pizza-dough-recipe.html

And some additional thoughts:

1. I used Harvest King Bread flour and got great results. Noticeably better than previous attempts with other flours. I used Red Star active dry yeast as well. For sauce I used what was lying around. These were experiments and not served to guests. :-)
2. The dough was divided equally into six balls. I believe it was 220 grams, but I'm not entirely sure about the exact weight.
3. The recipe states to get your pizza oven as hot as possible, but the recipe cooks at around 500-550F for 6-7 minutes. This is what I'd go for. I've tried it in my countertop Bakers Pride, but need to try it in my outdoor gas oven as well. I suspect it will be better in something that's closer to a wood-fired oven.
4. This dough recipe, as mentioned in previous replies, is extremely wet. That means it's really hard to work with. The key is to incorporate folds into the dough preparation to add structure to make the dough workable. I still have some work to do with technique, but I found that reballing the dough after about 6 hours and using the dough 24 hours later really made a huge difference.

In the book, they mention that this dough is different from what they use at the recipe. After doing some digging, I found there are two differences: fermentation time and lack of wheat germ. They ferment two days for the restaurant and leave out the wheat germ.

Hope this helps Francesco, and let me know if you have additional questions. This is still a work in progress for me, but I'll continue to update the thread. Please add anything you learn that would be helpful for the community!

Raj

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted over 1 year ago


Thanks Raj,

I've just tried this recipe although I'm aiming for a 48 hours fermentation.
I'll let you know how it turns out.
I had found the one you linked but was skeptical because I strongly believe that you can't achieve a decent result in terms of fermentation with just 3 or 4 hours from mixing the ingredients to baking the pizza, especially with a high gluten flour and an indirect technique as this one.
But by reading your comments I've decided to give it a try by increasing the times.
With a 48 hours I'll probably need to use the fridge, though and I'm not entirely sure how and when during the process.

Thanks,
Francesco

Francesco L.
posted over 1 year ago


I placed my dough in the refrigerator after completing the steps in the original recipe.

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted over 1 year ago


Raj,

Amazing work! I never had a pie from Mozza, only seen pics but your's looks very close.

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Mike K.
posted over 1 year ago

Thanks Mike! I'm convinced that there's still some work to do here. Working with high hydration dough requires a different set of skills. I'm kind of cheating by reballing the dough one last time. ๐Ÿ˜€

- Raj   over 1 year ago


Here are a couple of picture from my first attempt at this recipe on Saturday night.
The flour used was Caputo Rossa. 24 hours dough (~10 hours Poolish) at room temperature.
Some shape issues mostly caused due to handling an 85% hydration dough.
Baked in a regular house oven pre-heated at 550 degrees F with a baking steel on the top rack.
It was the first time I used Poolish for a Pizza dough. The dough was not one of the Best I've done/eaten and it had a bread-ish taste which might have been provided by the Poolish (although not 100% sure as it was also the first time I used this stronger flour).
I would also increase the amount of salt in the dough.
The Pizza was just a classic Margherita.
Definitely the hydration brings the overall dough to another level that's why yesterday I've re-done my usual recipe with a much higher hydration and probably achieved my personal Best result so far.

Medium 20161126 215637

Medium 20161126 215744

Francesco L.
posted over 1 year ago

Well done Francesco! These look better than my first attempt at the Mozza dough. ๐Ÿ˜€

You're definitely on the right track here. Did you try the extra step of reballing after a few hours? I noticed that it made a huge difference in terms of making shaping easier.

If you're going for the Mozza aesthetic, leaving a bigger rim and brushing is generously with olive oil gives it the brown puffy appearance, but again, that's just aesthetic. I'd also recommend trying the recipe with bread flour. The higher protein level will perform better at 550F.

- Raj   over 1 year ago

Thanks Raj,
No, I did not reball this time as considering various factors (amount of yeast/temperature) I felt I didn't have enough time to let the balls grow again.
A limitation I have is that I've never tried that original Pizza so I don't have a comparison term. I'm doing it just because of the people behind that Pizzeria and all the Great comments from around the Pizza scene which got me curious.
I'll definitely try again and implement your suggestions.

Thanks,
Francesco

- Francesco   over 1 year ago

I re-balled because the original ones lost shape. They just flattened into thick "pancakes". After re-forming, they held shape. Keep chipping away, you're making good progress!

- Raj   over 1 year ago


hey Francesco,
nice pizzas and great work for such high hydration doughs! For some reason I oftentimes also add more salt to my dough - but that might only be me adapting to my wife's passion for salt ๐Ÿ˜œ
I'm also having too much bread taste in my dough, too but I'm currently focusing on overall dough performance and will take on taste later.

@Raj: wow, so dough is not supposed to be like flat pancakes at pizza making time? that might explain my troubles.

Ulli Haus
posted over 1 year ago


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