Lloyd Pans


Is any one here using Lloyd pans? Mainly concerning the DSP. If you are did you make any adjustments to temperature and ingredients? If so, tell me what is working for you. Thanks for all replies!

Mark S.
posted about 2 years ago

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Hi Mark,

I own a "classic" Detroit Style pan and one of the coated Lloyd Pans. Unfortunately, I've only made pizzas in the Lloyd pan a couple of times. However, I'm making a few Detroit Style Pies next week. I'll be sure to share my findings.

The couple of pies I did make in the Lloyd Pan turned out well though. I didn't make any changes to the dough formulation. I kept the bake times consistent. The edges turned out a bit darker though. I think it should be fixable by adjusting temperature and maybe even the type of cheese.

Overall it seems like a pretty good pan.

Raj

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


Thanks Raj for that info....I love the Lloyd pans....no sticking what so ever...and you use very little oil...verses the oil and butter I used in the steel DSP pans...but when I first used my Loyd pans, I was burning my crust, literally black.....I was using a baking steel on top and regular stone on bottom....follow Tony's direction on cooking the DSP....I tried switching out the steel and put my regular stone back, that helped......I tweaked the malt and that help also.....next time I am going cut back on the temp and see what that will do.......

Mark S.
posted about 2 years ago


Shawn Randazzo is a World Champion Pizza Maker and owns several Detroit Style Pizza restaurants. Here is an article he wrote about LloydPans: https://www.detroitstylepizza.com/uncategorized/the-ultimate-detroit-style-pizza-pan-has-arrived/
Hope this helps.

Robert Johnson
posted almost 2 years ago


Hi Mark,

The Lloyd pans are working great. We have supplied many pizzerias with these pans and have had great feedback on them as well. Recently Descendant Pizzeria in Toronto opened up sporting all brand new Lloyd pans. I was there for the opening and it beat the heck out of having to season them all and break them in like we had to do with the old steel pans. Also no trying to chisel out pizzas in the process. Since their launch they have ordered more pans to keep up with demand. Let's just say Toronto is LOVING Detroit Style Pizza. :)

After working with these pans over the past year there is one noticeable difference I have noticed when it comes to baking with these pans.They lend a slightly darker crust bake. Depending on your recipe it may not even be as noticeable. If is a little to dark then I would suggest maybe tweaking recipe slightly. For example if use sugar or malt taking that down a little to see if looks better to you. All in all the only ones that really showed a concern about this are those who have been serving a much lighter color crust bake and they were concerned their customers will notice the change when they switch over to these new pans. Once they roll them out though I have not heard anything bad. Only other thing some are concerned about is the price, but the value in the quality of the pan, not having to season and maintain ultimately out weigh any cost concern.

The steel pans stopped production unless we ordered 80,000 at a time, which at the time the pans were being produced in Mexico with less quality material. This is after Behrens bought that production line from Dover Parkersburg. Then Behrens dropped those sku's. We could not justify investing in such poor quality pans so we looked into manufacturing our own and also tested a dozen dif. so called Detroit Style pans from a handful of manufacturers and Lloyds came out on top by far. We have since partnered with Lloyds to offer our clients and those wanting to make Detroit Style Pizza the best price on these pans. They have had to increase production and staff to meet the demand of this pan recently as well.

FYI: A couple well known New York pizzerias are launching DSP on their menu and opening up a DSP inspired pizzeria, very cool! I am sure New York will fall in love...too! I wish them much success.

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Shawn Randazzo
posted almost 2 years ago


Hey Shawn,
Thanks for your reply.....I think I finially got the upper hand on these pans after much tweaking and adjusting...I have cut down my temp from 500 to 450....cut the malt by half..70% hydration rate...I just cooked 2 DSP last night and it they turned out just right.......crust was a healthy brown color and a great crunch...I am in love with the DSP.....and it is a shame I have not come across it earlier, I got relatives in Michigan....and made several visits...never had a DSP....we ate pizza, at the local pizzera, Sportsman in Wyandotte and one pizza place in Greek City close to the casinos, but my next visit, I hope to fix that.....I hoping to pay ya a visit in the near future!

Mark S.
posted almost 2 years ago


I am one of the owners/operators opening a Detroit inspired pizzeria in Brooklyn.

We have been testing the LLoyd pans in our range oven (as we don't have our deck yet.) I'm sure the deck will lend itself to a different bake, but here are my observations so far.

I can definitely say the Lloyd pans are giving me a darker bake on the bottom (see attached pictures.) Sometimes, the bottom even becomes more waxy/plasticy in a way... It's almost like the oil is caramelized. I'm generally baking for around 12 minutes...so probably close to 550 (I go more by the time then by the temp dial as temperatures will fluctuate in this oven.) I am NOT baking on a stone yet, and still get a pretty dark bottom. I also think my stamped pans get a little bit darker than the welded. Sometimes, it seems they get dark but NOT crispy on the bottom, which defies logic for me.

That being said, I've cooked on the bottom steel of the oven and moved racks, etc. Different results, so maybe the deck oven just gives a better bake.

No sugar in my dough, but we do use a small percentage of oil that may be contributing to this that I will be eliminating for further testing. Mid 70s hydration, but no other additives other than the typical salt and yeast.

I'll definitely be tweaking, as these pans do bake a little differently than steel pans. There are some pictures attached of different pies; you can see the difference in them.

If anyone is using these in a deck oven, would love to hear about your experience.

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Lou T.
posted almost 2 years ago

Hey Lou T
I love the Loyd's pans, but they definitly cook different from the steel pans I first used...my first bake on the DSP L P, my bottom crust was burnt black....I was cooking in my home electric oven with a steel on top and stone on the bottom. I made several adustments before I got it right.....one thing I did was take the steel out, and put in back my regular stone, that help.....things got better when I cut down the malt amount and turn the temperature down some...450 to 480....after that I was getting happy with my results......tommorow I am going to experiment again, I am going to cook 2 small DSP....one with the malt and one without......the one without malt, I did put a very small amount of sugar, to feed the yeast....I heard you were going to try putting no sugar in your dough...how did that turn out?

- Mark   over 1 year ago


That is awesome Lou! After you posted this I realized we have been trading emails back and forth about pans and things for a while. I am sure your DSP will do great and excited to see how things go when you launch. Let's definitely keep in touch.

Deck will perform much better than range. We use Blodgett's with steel decks. In your range you may want to turn the temp down a little to prevent getting so dark, maybe 500 and see if there is a considerable difference. In our deck ovens we bake at 525 F and a cheese and pepperoni takes around 10-11 mins. You should get an all together better bake in a deck compared to a range.

In regards to the waxy texture on the bottom, it should not be like that and it should have a nice crunch. When the pizza comes out do you take it out of the pan right away? Also once you take it out where do you put it, directly on a bare aluminum/steel serving tray? I am wondering if the condensation from the bottom not being able to breath it may be causing it? Does it have this texture directly out of oven or after it sits for a bit. Also how long is the dough in the pan before you bake it?

We have had some of these pans in rotation now for almost a year and they are producing very consistent crunchy crusts. I know VIA 313 in Austin has recently switched over to all Lloyds, Descendant Pizza in Toronto recently launched with all Lloyds and many others have as well. The only similar feedback would be a slighter darker bake.

I am looking forward to seeing how New York takes to your DSP. I am sure they will love it. You will also notice ex-Detroiters and Michiganders come out of the wood work to support what you are doing and will thank you for bringing it Brooklyn. Over the last couple decades Detroit has lost hundreds of thousands of people that are all over the country missing their Motown pizza.

If anyone else has ever experienced the same "waxy" "plastic" like texture on the bottom of their crusts please chime in.

Thanks,

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Shawn Randazzo
posted almost 2 years ago


Shawn,

Thanks for chiming in! I always Pop the pie out of the pan and onto a cooling rack to keep the pie as crispy as possible.

Im sure the deck will help alleviate the minor issues I'm having. I have produced some amazing pies in the Lloyd pans; I think my current cooking environment just makes it a little difficult to dial in.

That being said, I'll probably be popping it out of the pan and onto the stone to crisp up the bottom when I'm up and running. Some of my favorite squares do this (and, I noticed, some of my favorite pies were on the reheat!)

Lou T.
posted almost 2 years ago


Hello everyone,
How do the Lloyd pans differ from the Allied Metal pans?
Thanks
Brian P.

Brian Papesh
posted almost 2 years ago


I have made fantastic DSP with all 3 Detroit Style Pan companies, including Allied, Cold Rolled (not a company but name of pan that is no longer manufactured) and Lloyd. The key is consistency when doing high volume. At my pizzerias I am trying to transition into using the same pan from one company. By having one pan I believe the consistency of my DSP's will increase. We only use deck ovens for baking our DSP, either Bakers Pride or Blodgett, at temperatures above 600 F depending on the pan, altitude, barometric pressure and season.
I really like how simple it is to use the Lloyd pans in terms of not having to season the pan and how easy the pizza comes out of the pan after the final bake. The major drawback on LLoyd is the $$price$$ and possibly the untested longevity of their pans. Their pan is 3-4 xs the cost of Allied and 5xs the cost of Colded Rolled. I would recommend testing each pan to see which pan works best for your own personal recipes and procedures on making a DSP pizza. Good Luck!

Jeff Smoke
posted almost 2 years ago


Jeff,

Where are you sourcing the Allied pans from? My local distributor quoted a price even higher than the comparable sized Lloyd pans. Also, it's worth noting I've seen these offered in plain steel and with their nonstick black-buster coating (not nearly as durable as the Lloyd pan coating.)

Lou T.
posted almost 2 years ago


@Jeff Smoke, Would you mind sharing where your source of the Allied pans was? They quoted me extreme prices...more than the Lloyds so I'm curious where you find them at a third of the price

Lou T.
posted over 1 year ago

Direct from Allied in New York. Allied sent me sample pans for testing. Not sure of cost as I never purchased any pans.

- Jeff   over 1 year ago


My last DSP I cooked after making adustments.

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Mark S.
posted over 1 year ago


Hi everyone. You can buy the Allied Metal black buster coated Sicilian and Chicago Deep Dish pans from Peoples Restaurant Supplies in Michigan. Call Gary at 313-567-1944 he will be glad to help you.

13” round Chicago deep dish SRPS13 13” round x 1 7/8”
12x18 Sicilian B1218 12” x 18” x 1”
12x12 Sicilian B1212 12” x 12” x 1”

Brian Papesh
posted over 1 year ago


And you can compare and buy the LloydPans products from Shawn Randazzo at
https://www.detroitstylepizza.com/product-category/detroit-style-pizza-pans-2/

No pre-seasoning and easy release.

If you are looking for round Chicago deep dish or Sicilian pans, you can buy those direct from the manufacturer at http://www.lloydpans.com/standard-pans/pizza-tools

Robert Johnson
posted over 1 year ago


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