(low vs high?) Diastatic Malt Powder


The Diastatic Malt Powder I have from King Arthur says to use 1/2 to 1 teaspoon per 3 cups of flour. The recipes in Pizza Bible require at least a tablespoon. for about that much flour. Whose instructions should I be following? I saw somewhere that there is something called "low diastatic malt." Are there two kinds of malt? Are we supposed to adjust accordingly?

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Maria .
posted about 3 years ago

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I used to use King Arthur malt until I started buying all my ingredient from the pizza bible store. I just followed Tony's master dough recipe using King Arthur's malt and didn't have an issue. With that said, in my opinion, Tony's low diastatic malt (now available from the pizza bible store) gave better results.

james genna
posted about 3 years ago


Maria,

TG suggests a low-diastatic malt from Central Milling/AB Maury, which is the same thing, and has a Lintner degree of 20 whereas the King Arthur malt has a Lintner degree of 100.

So KA's malt is on the stronger, more potent side. I'd stick with TG's recommendation.

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Mike K.
posted about 3 years ago


Thanks. Thing is, I still have a lot of the King Arthur. I bought a 1 lb bag. I also have a lb of the non-diastatic for bagels (which runs out more quickly because it's used in higher quantities). The Lintner degree sounds like pretty important information, but the exact number/degree is not included on the product packaging or in the recipe. isn't that weird? Mike: are you a brewer or baker? How did you find out about Lintner degrees? Near as I can figure, I should follow the KA package instructions for 1/2-1 tsp per 3 cups of flour, right? I guess Tony calls for 1 tablespoon for just under 4 cups because he's referring to a lower potency malt. --assuming I understand everyone correctly Mike: how did you find out the exact degree of the different malts? Is it published somewhere?

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Maria .
posted about 3 years ago

Maria,

I found out about KA's malt, for example, by just emailing them and asking. They freely share additional information just as Bob's Red Mill did when I inquired about the ash content in their semolina flour.

What bugs me is that an important value, such as Lintner degree in malt, is left off the package data. There are several malts out there in different potencies and it can have a significant effect on the finished dough, imo.

Here's a good read on malts:

http://www.briess.com/food/Processes/maltclasses.php#standard

Hope that helps.

- Mike   about 3 years ago


Wow, I emailed KA about the Lintner degree for their malt and they told me they don't know what it is. Nor could the specify high or low diastatic for their malt. The KA diastatic malt I had a weird smell, I can't even describe it. It effected my dough flavor a bit. I wasn't impressed with their malt and it now just lives in my pantry. Any who, that's two votes for Tony's malt. I'd get some of Tony's malt if you are able to and then you can compare as I did.

james genna
posted about 3 years ago


There's not much information that I can find about degrees Lintner of diastatic malt. The information out there seems to pertain primarily to brewers who use it in their mash. It must be new to pizza dough. Apparently it converts the sugars in flour into a more readily digestible form for the yeast. We have similar enzymes in our saliva to convert carbs into sugars in our mouths. Anyway, I think the most prudent thing a user can do in light of the info. posted by Matt, is to use it as recommended on the package. There seems to be different potencies--according to Matt, anyway. I can't really find any detailed info. about it. I wrote to KA, but the answer indicates that the person who responded knows less about it then folks here.

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Maria .
posted about 3 years ago


Hi Maria,

Unfortunately, I don't know enough about diastatic malts to know understand the various types and their properties. I wouldn't worry too much about it though. I've used malt from KA, Amazon and the one we offer on The Pizza Bible store and have gotten decent results with all three. That said in the last couple of years, I've only been using Tony's malt, so I'd be making an Apples to Oranges comparison if I were to compare the three.

With respect to the recipes in The Pizza Bible, I'd recommend following them as closely as possible. The recommendations you see on a package or the product page of a Website should be considered rough guidelines, but if you're following a recipe, and a specific amount is mentioned, it's better to use the amount specified in the recipe. I typically follow recipes the first few times. Once I have a good feel for it, then I start experimenting.

Raj

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 3 years ago


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