Master Dough Without Starter is Sticky


Hi,

First time poster, long time pizza consumer. I've been making pizzas for awhile now, but just recently discovered the amazing Pizza Bible. I tried the master dough without starter and found it to be quite sticky. I did use KA bread flour, but otherwise followed the recipe. I also stored my dough in a container in the fridge (which I plan on not doing anymore).

I normally get my crust ready for the oven on parchment paper, but the dough was really sticky and became a little hard to work with. I did finally get it managed enough to make a pizza, which was delicious.

Any thoughts on what I did wrong, or what I could do to prevent this? Or is it normal?

Thanks!

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Andy D.
posted about 2 years ago

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Nice pie Andy, and welcome.

Chances are you didn't do anything wrong. First, a question: are you using a scale or relying on volume measurements (cups)? If you don't have a scale, they're fairly inexpensive and will make things lot more consistent. Measuring in grams is ideal.

If I had to bet, I'd say you probably made the dough correctly. The Master Dough recipe most likely has a higher hydration point (percentage of water to flour) than the recipe you're used to working with. This will make it stickier, but it's also one of the things that makes it better. The recipe also calls for allowing the dough to come to temperature before stretching it. These two factors will make it a little trickier to work with.

A lot of this will come down to practice. You can use semolina instead of flour, or a semolina/flour mix, for your bench flour. This will make it a lot easier to work with. If the dough is sticking to your fingers, you can dip them in water. This keeps dough from sticking.

Regarding storing dough in containers, there's nothing wrong with it. I do it because it saves space and keeps the dough in a circular shape. Your goal should be to remove the ball from the container as gently as possible. Don't use glass. Plastic works better. And, be gentle. You can loosen up the edges and then flip the container upside down and leave it on the counter for a couple of minutes. Gravity will do the rest.

Hope this helps.

-Raj

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


Hi Raj. I do use a scale. I usually weigh in ounces, but it changes to grams with the push of a button. I may try the semolina/flour mix in the future.

My other recipes apparently do have a lower hydration point. I've made the grandma's dough from the pizza bible, but just attributed the stickiness with that to it being basically Sicilian, which I have made before.

I'll definitely try this again, and maybe use a pan in the fridge and see if that's easier for me. My other doughs are much more forgiving with a lower hydration, lol.

Thanks!

Andy D.
posted about 2 years ago


Andy, the Grandma pie, which uses a Sicilian dough has a very high hydration-- around 70% if I recall. The Master Dough is lower than the hydration, but still higher than a lot of other recipes. But, compared to the Sicilian it will be harder. Pan pizzas tend to be easier and forgiving in terms of the stretching out the dough.

Thumb raji
Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


Hmm, well I guess I will just need more practice!

Andy D.
posted about 2 years ago


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