More pies from tonight -- New York and Greek Style


A few more pics from tonight. I took a second shot at the New England Greek style and sorted out most of the issues. I set my oven to 450F today instead of 500F and got a *much* better result. Also, I used a sweeter sauce. I was blown away by how close it was to the Greek pizzerias I grew up with in Boston. Next time I'll add some provolone and reduce the amount of oil spread across the bottom of the pan.

For the New York style, I used Tony's 00 Artisan flour and did a 2 day rise. I added olive oil, malt, sugar. Hydration was at 63%. I did a lousy job shaping the pie, but was still very pleased with how it turned out.

Medium greek 1

Medium ny 1

Medium ny 2

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted over 2 years ago

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What is Greek Style exactly? I've never heard of that before. Sounds interesting.

Nicolas Rodriguez
posted over 2 years ago

New England Greek is a regional style that you'll find in New England. Typically the dough is spread out in pans and then baked. The sauce is a bit sweeter, and cheese usually consists of a blend of mozzarella, provolone and/or mild white cheddar. The thing about this style is that most places do a mediocre job with their pies. But when you get a good one, it's amazing.

This is a great post. http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2011/08/the-pizza-lab-how-to-make-new-england-greek-style-pizza-at-home.html

- Raj   over 2 years ago


Raj, quick question: what were the benefits you saw from lowering the temperature to 450 from 500? BTW, great looking pie!

John W.
posted about 1 year ago


It'll vary by style and oven, but lowering the oven temperature increases the bake time, which in turn affects the texture. Usually you get a drier texture. That sounds bad, but if I recall correctly, with these pizzas, cooking at 550F was making a pie that was a bit soft.

Most of the advice out there is "crank the oven up as high as it will go". It's sound advice in some cases, but temperature is worth playing around with. Make the same pie at a few different oven temps, and you'll be surprised by the difference.

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 1 year ago

Lowering the temp a bit has helped me too, especially after getting a baking steel. I was getting burnt crust with less than sufficiently cheese far too often when I had the temperature up to 500F or more. I try to keep it around 475F now and that has really helped things to cook more evenly.

- Christopher   about 1 year ago


Thanks Raj. I'll give your suggestion a try. Again, nice looking pies.

John W.
posted about 1 year ago

Thanks John! It's not too clear from the pics, but the first one is the New England Greek and the remaining two photos are the New York Style. Please let us know how it goes.

- Raj   about 1 year ago


mm looks delicious! Is that from the bible? What is it called? Have you tried the pie w/feta cheese?

Maria .
posted about 1 year ago


Thanks Maria! These pies weren't from The Pizza Bible, but my tricks and techniques are heavily influenced by the book. Some recipes from The Pizza Bible I follow to the tee, then there are some styles that I make even better (imho) by doing my own things.

So, New England Greek Style is a regional style that is often confused with pizza topped with Greek ingredients. Both are awesome, and more on each style below.

Feta on pizza: awesome, but it's an accent and something I use sparingly. My favorite "Greek topped" pizza is lemon olive oil, crumbled feta, mushrooms, baby spinach and red onion. Sun dried tomatoes and Kalamata olives are a favorite when I go this route. The attached pic is one I made 7 (I'm old!) years ago.

Now, back to New England Greek pizza. It's a paradox.. In this case two (or more than two) wrongs make a right! This post sums it up quite well, but my recipe differs:

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/08/new-england-greek-style-pizza.html

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 1 year ago


So you're a lucky lefty! What kind of oven is that? That's a nice set-up there. Why is that New England regional style called "Greek?" There doesn't seem to be anything specifically Greek about it. The recipe for the pie with the actual Greek ingredients is from where?

Maria .
posted about 1 year ago


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