Need new knives


Looking to get some new knives. Can anyone suggest a brand or model I should look at?

Gil W.
posted over 2 years ago

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The Shun classic knives are absolutely amazing. Shun has some even nicer models, but I haven't tried them.

They're available at Williams-Sonoma and Sur La Table, but you can get them much cheaper at Bed Bath and Beyond with those 20% off coupons.

A side note about knives: never buy a set. Just get a chef's/santoku, paring and serrated knife. And a honing steel. Give them a swipe before each use and they'll stay sharp for a long time.

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted over 2 years ago


I know which knives I need, just don't know what brand is good. All I know is that I'm not going carbon steel

Gil W.
posted over 2 years ago


So.....why is it you do not want a carbon steel blade? If you are not going to purchase a carbon steel blade, which is pretty much industry standard for the best blades because of their ability to receive and maintain a sharp edge, what kind of blade is it that you are looking for? (BTW, we have Shun and Tojiro DP knives. I replaced my Wusthof knives when I first discovered Shun knives, about 15 years ago, and have never looked back. The Shun have a stainless Damascus-type steel sheathing over a high carbon steel core. I think their Rockwell hardness is 60 or so. In addition, their construction and steel quality allow them to take a 16 degree edge, as opposed to German knives, which are usually 20-22 degrees, and seem quite dull by comparison, even when sharpened!)

Ken K.
posted over 2 years ago


Carbon steel rusts and stains easy and very brittle. Not to mention really expensive

Gil W.
posted over 2 years ago


I understand. However, just for your consideration...carbon steel does not rust when it is dried after use; Japanese VR-10 steel has a Rockwell rating of 60-61---hard but not brittle; a good knife is truly a lifetime investment.

Ken K.
posted over 2 years ago


Went to a Japanese knife store and found this beauty

https://toshoknifearts.com/shop/knives/kaneshige-180mm-santoku-stainless-clad-blue-2-pakka-wood

$340 with tax

Might get it next week. . .

Gil W.
posted over 2 years ago


Sorry my bad, the one i want is about 9.25 inches but that model

Gil W.
posted over 2 years ago


Personally, I find comfort to be the most important thing. And I know several chefs who have the same opinion. I've seen one wax on poetically about a Chicago Cutlery boning knife. I've used that particular knife and wasn't a fan. Didn't fit my hand well. Also, many would consider it cheap.

As a general rule of thumb (at least for German style) the harder, more expensive knives will hold an edge longer but be harder to sharpen. So you can typically either go cheaper and resharpen easily, or more expensive and resharpen less frequently (but it'll be more difficult to sharpen).

Japanese knives are a bit different. They big takeaway is they can have a sharper cutting angle, which can make it feel easier to cut through things. But you have to be careful that you get the correct knife for what you are doing. I have a nakiri I bought when visiting Japan. Thing is a dream to cut with. But the blade is so delicate you can only use it for vegetables. I'm pretty sure I recently damaged one small section of it cutting through a hard part of garlic. Something like a Santoku or Gyuto are good all around types.

Victorionox and excellent bang for the buck (IMHO).

Agree with Raj that sets are a bad idea. And depending on the knife you might like different brands depending on the knife. For example, my general Chef's knife is from one of the big german companies, but I hate the tiny handles on their paring knives so I went with a different brand for that.

The steel just helps keep a knife sharp, it will not sharpen it. You'll need to sharpen yourself or find someone to do it (figure about every 6 months). Make sure you use wood or plastic cutting boards (not glass).

Mark S.
posted over 2 years ago


Thx for all the info, I'm taking a culinary night school course which is one of the top programs in the city so I might just get something cheap as training wheels and once I get better I'll treat myself to Japanese steel.

I'll let you guys know what I end up getting

Gil W.
posted over 2 years ago


I did more field research and came across this small shop I found online who sells both European and Japanese knives.

I talked to the owner and he gave me an hour of education on steel and chefs knives.

After spilling a bit of blood (which happens often at his shop), the owner directed me to a french company whose been making no compromise knives since 1834.

http://www.sabatier-shop.com/kitchen-knives_1_authentique_cooking-knife-10-in__1110cui25poa.html

http://www.sabatier-shop.com/kitchen-knives_129_authentique-1834-limited_1834---10-in-cooking-knife__1834cuis25.html

Above are the two blades I narrowed it down to which are under $200 CDN and free lifetime sharpening (or lessons on how to sharpen my knives properly).

Let me know what you guys think

Gil W.
posted over 2 years ago


I get mine at Korin in New York on Warren St. Their website is great too. I stick with Masamoto and they have carbon as well as coated. If you cut anything acidic like an onion, tomato, garlic the carbon will react and affect the flavor of the food as well as rust. I dry my carbon knives and coat them with a food grade oil before putting them away. My Damascus steel are my best but they are definitely an investment. Nenox are great if you like heavier knives and the Korin brand are pretty great for a less expensive alternative. Definitely get a 1000 grit and 5000 or 6000 grit polishing stone to keep them sharp.

Gregory McCarty
posted over 2 years ago


Sabatier make great knives but are made out of very hard steel. Need special stones and takes a long time to sharpen. I prefer Japanese personally and have been a chef for many years. It's very important once you make the decision to hold the knife. you need to be comfortable with the feel.

Gregory McCarty
posted over 2 years ago


Thx for all the help and advice

Gil W.
posted over 2 years ago


So I decided to go for the K sabatier knives from a father/son shop.

As it was explained to me, Japanese and European/American styles of cooking are VERY different. Japanese slice while European/American chop. Japanese knives can't take the abuse of cutting though a chicken bone like the European/American knives.

Since they are handmade, I held about 4 of the same model knife just to see which one fit me best. Same knife, same model, tiny differences in the craftsmanship. Got myself a boning and fillet knife. The only chef knife they had left was the display model so i'm going to wait til they get more so I can pick the right one.

I will post a pic of my full kit once the chef knife comes in.

Doing the culinary course at one of the top schools in the city so i'm in it for the long haul.

Gil W.
posted over 2 years ago


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