Non soggy Neapolitan pizza


Hi.

I love authentic Neapolitan pizza but really don't like the soggy centre. I have a Woodfired oven and have more recently been making new York style pizza as it is more crowd pleasing. My Local pizza restaurant makes an amazing Neapolitan pizza that is also stiff enough to hold. Any suggestions how I can achieve this?

Angus Y.
posted 4 months ago

Save 0

I see 3 possible reasons: 1/ too much tomato sauce or toping. In this case the dough cannot be baken properly. The tomatoe toping must be very thin like described in the book 2/the dough is too thin in the center 3/ The floor of your oven is not warm enough.
The Napoletana pizza (with poolish starter) I did was not soggy in the center.

Woody U.
posted 3 months ago


Hi Angus,
having a soggy, wet, juicy center is part of what defines it as pizza Napoletana. Perhaps, check out the style called classic Italian. Use 250 - 300g of dough for a 10" pie and bake for 2-3 minutes @ 400°C.

Ulli Haus
posted 3 months ago


HI Ulli, I just checked out your Neapolitan Pizza pics and they look superb. I have ordered the book and am waiting for it to arrive. I have made similair kinds of neapolitan pizzas, and as nice as they are, they are a knife and fork deal. For me the perfect pizza is the leopard skin crust with just enough strength through the base to support its own weight, making it a hand food once again. As I said my favourite pizza shop manages to do it, but I can't get it right. Maybe the book will help !!??

Angus Y.
posted 3 months ago


Hi Angus,
thanks for the compliment. The book is really great. It got me going and set the spark for all that followed. It does not just have great dough recipes for so many different styles, it also gives you great topping compositions (which is the next hard step, once you master the dough).

I just got back from Naples, where I another pizza class and also tested many famous Neapolitan pizza places in order to get an idea of what the authentic Pizza Napoletana tastes like.
--> People mainly eat it with their hands and fold a big slice ;-)

However, if you do like to reproduce what your favorite Pizzeria offers, we could do the following:
Try to find out
1) Baking time and temp
2) dough ball size
and
3) post a picture of the pizza (top view, bottow view and cross section)

If you don't get all these info, we can infer them from what you have.

Then we come up with a recipe and you make it yourself ;)
LG Ulli

Ulli Haus
posted 3 months ago


Thanks for the info. I received the book yesterday and it looks great. The Neapolitan pizzas I have made before were a lot more basic so I am looking forward to trying the poolish starter. Some of the toppings and tips are really helpful

Angus Y.
posted 3 months ago


I too make more of a neo-neapolitan mostly as it tends to be more popular with my guests, however I also like a crispier bottom to the neapolitan pizza and here's what I do. I've had great success by not over kneading the dough to keep it very light and tender (sounds counter intuitive I know) and building the pizza upside down. In other words cheese first. It's harder to get used to adding the sauce, particularly not too much but you can get used to doing so, just find your own technique. I make napaletona that stands straight out and has a wonderful crispy bottom. I use OO for this pizza.

Mark Rand
posted 3 months ago

Yes a wood fired brick oven.

- Mark   about 2 months ago


I will certainly try cheese first. Makes sense but certainly will take some getting use too. Are you baking in a Woodfired oven?

Angus Y.
posted 3 months ago


As some of the Neapolitan pizzeria do for take away pizza, below 400c and cook for 3 minutes, this will give a more crispy crust.
Also, load less sauce n topping in the center.

Francis Ho
posted about 2 months ago


Sign In to reply to this post