Sicilian Take 1


About to christen my new 12x18" pan on Monday and made some 73% hydration dough for what hopefully will turn out a nice fluffy, airy and light crust.

Dough weight is about 1kg (1000 grams). IF everything works out nicely, I'll put the Baker's percentages up. If not, no need for those because it'll be back to the drawing board. ;)

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Medium sicilian

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Mike K.
posted about 2 years ago

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I'm wondering why the pics never show up in the order I uploaded them...Raj? Help! :)

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Mike K.
posted about 2 years ago

Hmm. I will look into it Mike. I think the order might be based on ascending order of the filename.

- Raj   about 2 years ago


Looking good.
Please post some more pics of the final pie

Tony Gemignani admin
posted about 2 years ago


I will, TG.

That's the dough after 24 hrs in the fridge. Nice and puffy. I think I'll do half of spicy Calabrese and half just cheese and sauce.

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Mike K.
posted about 2 years ago


After two days cold ferment...very airy. Dough is now out to come up to room temp for the next cpl of hours before going on the sheet pan for a parbake.

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Mike K.
posted about 2 years ago


Stretched out nicely. And it's now proofing

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Mike K.
posted about 2 years ago


The result was less spectacular than I expected. It's mostly due to poor dough management and mistakes I made along the way (proofing & too much oil in the pan).

I'll have to work with this type of pie a bit more in the future and hopefully will get a better outcome, crust-wise.

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Medium pie

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Mike K.
posted about 2 years ago


Hmmmm.... I made a Sicilian dough this past weekend and baked it last night (along with two focaccia). We thought is was delicious, and its crumb looks similar to yours. I used All Trumps flour, which we prefer to the Pendletons (we also love Tony's Artisan and central milling high mountain high gluten). The bottom has a nice crunch with a luscious softness to the crumb. I have no experience with a "real" Sicilian, though for comparison...

Medium 1sicilian dough 4 7

Medium 2sicillian whole

Medium 3sicillian piece

Ken K.
posted about 2 years ago


Actually, now that I see it, the crumb is a bit more airy.

I will post some photos of the top and bottom of one focaccia, which has a similar appearance to the Sicilian pizza. Both were baked in Allied Metal BB pans---I like those pans that I sleep with them under my pillow.... ;-) I can see that there is still a little work to be done with turning the pans to have a more even browning, but, frankly, I am not that compulsive :-)

Medium 1focaccia

Medium 2focaccia

Ken K.
posted about 2 years ago


Speaking of Sicilian pies, mine look pretty close to Ken's in terms of crumb and overall aesthetic. One thing I've noticed is that the bottom ends up being a little tough. Has anyone experienced this?

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago


I find that the bottom is delightfully crunchy, and we like that it is juxtaposed with a soft, flavorful crumb. As I said, I don't know what a "real" Sicilian pizza or focaccia "should" taste like, but we like what the recipe has produced.

Ken K.
posted about 2 years ago


Ken,

Yours looks like what I was shooting for. Mine was a tad too saturated with oil and it just wasn't up to par.

I was looking for a light, airy, fluffy and somewhat drier version. Like I said, I was the culprit by messing it up.

Raj,

Could be the oil that makes it tougher during baking. Mine was just too tough.

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Mike K.
posted about 2 years ago


That's probably it Mike. I've been using a pretty liberal amount of oil. I'll reduce it. Thanks!

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted about 2 years ago

I used way too much oil. So that's the only thing I can think of.

- Mike   about 2 years ago


I used 1/4 cup of oil for my 12 x 18" pan, first coating the top of the dough by inverting my dough pan to place the dough's "top" in its oil bath, then flipping it over and stretching it. The next time I make either the Sicilian pizza or the focaccia, I will make one with 1/8 cup (two tablespoons) of the oil and one with no oil to see what happens to the bottom, recognizing that the focaccia is only baked once while the Sicilian is baked twice. I have had zero adherence of the crust to the Allied Metal BB pans, so I suspect that I could bake with only a faint coating of oil (to facilitate the stretching), although I am unclear how "faint" that amount would be...

Raj, we like the crispy bottom--but we don't find it tough at the color that you can see up above in the photos...

Ken K.
posted about 2 years ago


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