Temperature for master dough in brick oven


In The Pizza Bible, the recommended temperature for the master dough in a home oven is 500 degrees. For the Caputo dough in the brick oven the recommended temperature is 900 degrees. When I visited Tony's pizzeria in SF, I had a delicious pizza baked in the brick oven. I don't think it used Caputo dough. What dough was used and at what temperature?

Bill O.
posted over 2 years ago

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That bears the question which style did you have at Tony's? Neapolitan? Coal-fired? California?

The California also uses Caputo but also has spelt, whole wheat and I think semolina in it, but I'm not a 100% sure. However, Cali-style is also baked in the WFO.

Tony can give you the exact info but I hope this helps.

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Mike K.
posted over 2 years ago

Raj, thank you. Yes, it was the main dining area. The only reason I question whether it was Caputo was because the pizza was quite unlike the pizza I ate in Naples and southern Italy.

- Bill   over 2 years ago

Mike, thanks for replying. According to The Pizza Bible, California uses the master dough recipe (high protein flour) and in the home oven bakes at 500 degrees. I think my question is whether I can use the master dough recipe in my brick oven but perhaps bake at around 600 degrees.

- Bill   over 2 years ago


It sounds like you're referring to the wood-fired oven that's in the main dining area. If I'm not mistaken, the only pies baked in it are the Neapolitan pizzas. These are made with Caputo 00.

Tony should be able to confirm.

Raj

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted over 2 years ago


Bill & Raj...

I did a quick double-take on Tony's menu and it mentions there that the California is baked in the WFO. I'm a little confused now. Maybe things changed on the menu?

Also, perhaps the California pizza dough was adapted to home ovens instead of WFO. Hopefully Tony will chime in and give his feedback.

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Mike K.
posted over 2 years ago


For what it's worth, in the Pizza Bible, California Style refers to a set of original pizzas with fresh ingredients, unconventional techniques, and doughs that use a variety of flours. Some of them use the master dough (and even with the doughs themselves, there are different techniques--take a look at the Eddie Muenster as an example, that dough gets flipped early in the bake), but others use a variety of different doughs. So it's not as though what's called "California Style" in the book strictly correlates to the menu at Tony's.

Adam Sachs
posted over 2 years ago


Adam, Thanks. That helps to clarify the situation. The test for me will come when I use the Napoletana recipe in my brick oven in a few weeks.

Bill O.
posted over 2 years ago


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