Tony's Artisan 00 flour pizza results, and a question


I would like to ask a question. What causes blistering in a rim crust? The reason I asked is I tried Tony's Artisan 00 flour with my normal dough formulation. I achieved more blistering on the rim crust than normal. I do get some blistering but not as much as when using your new flour. I really like blistering in a rim crust and am curious to know how blistering is achieved.

Thanks!

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Norma K.
posted over 2 years ago

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I can't comment on the blistering, but I will say that slice sure does look tasty.

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Raj Irukulla admin
posted over 2 years ago

Its can be for a number of reasons.
Preferments that are high in acidity, or you delay fermentation this causes the gluten in the dough it create pockets, mini weak spots in and during the fridge fermentation and while maximizing the staging period. When this happens and the pizza is cooked it had already created pockets so mini blisters that are also called chicken poxs if I remeber right come out when cooked on the surface. I have a very high gluten so this would be a common thing to see. Some bakers could say it's a defect. Meaning they don't want to see it.. I on the other hand like it !!!

- Tony   over 2 years ago


Thanks Raj, I would like to find out somehow where the blistering comes from.

Norma K.
posted over 2 years ago


It's most likely caused by yeast activity right under the thin layer of the dough/skin. If you want that type of blistering on a consistent basis, handle the dough as delicately as possible, at least on the outer rim/crust.

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Mike K.
posted over 2 years ago


Thanks for your reply Mike! I didn't know if it was Tony's OO flour that causes the blistering I like. I can't get consistent blistering like I did when I used Tony's 00 flour. I do have some blistering in my rim crusts, but not like when I used Tony's OO flour. Will see what I can do to try to create more blistering on my normal pies.

Norma K.
posted over 2 years ago

Maybe TG can chime in on this at some point, but what I replied in my other post was something I had wondered before as well and a baker suggested to me that it's yeast activity.

Keep us posted, Norma. :)

- Mike   over 2 years ago


Norma,

That should explain it.

The formation of blisters can be encouraged by using one or a combination of the following techniques:

Using highly acidic preferments (dough fermented in advance);
Delaying fermentation during proofing (final dough-rise step before baking);
Misting the dough with water prior to baking;
Injecting hot steam into the oven during the initial phase of baking.

Of the four mentioned, the most common implemented technique to induce blisters is extending the proofing period. This is done by incubating the dough at cooler temperatures, often in a refrigerator or dough retarder.

When dough is chilled to as low as 3°C / 38°F for several hours, gluten degrades and the dough retains a reservoir of excess gas produced by active yeast. Because gases are more soluble in water at cooler temperatures, the carbon dioxide generated by the yeast slowly dissolves and diffuses throughout the dough. (Have you ever noticed that chilled soda is fizzier than lukewarm soda? The same effect applies.) When the dough is loaded into the hot, preheated oven, the retained gas dissipates and seeps to the dough surface, forming pockets of carbon dioxide and thus expanding the exterior.

Voila! You’ve achieved blistering.

In France, bakers traditionally refresh their sourdough starters more frequently and do not chill their dough to minimize or eliminate sourness. Consequently, blisters are seldom observed and generally regarded as defects by the French. Not surprisingly, the majority of French bakers avoid blisters—on their breads and likely their bodies.

Blisters are strong indications that the dough was fermented for hours, perhaps days, and often characterized by a piquant tang. In San Francisco, USA, where tangy breads are not considered unusual, this attribute may be sought after.

http://www.sourdoughlibrary.org/bread-crust-blisters/

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Mike K.
posted over 2 years ago


That's a better explanation than what I out but that is what I was trying to explain.. Hope that helps

Tony Gemignani admin
posted over 2 years ago


Thanks so much Mike and Tony for explaining how blistering occurs! Since I didn't delay fermentation while proofing, didn't use a preferment, and none of the other things, it might be Tony's 00 flour in combination with other things that made the blisters more pronounced. I love blisters. I will repeat the same thing I did to see if I can get the blistering again. It might have been cause by the yeast activity right under the thin layer of the skin rim. I couldn't post another photo, but in the skin rim there was a place that looked like a gluten bubble that I gently patted down, but didn't break. The gluten bubble looked to be highly developed gluten in my opinion. The dough ball was a pleasure to open. The blisters could have been from what Tony and Mike posted, because the dough sat at room temperature for awhile. I know the dough ball almost tripled in size because I used the “poppy seed” trick to see how much the dough ball fermented. The yeast activity might have been right under the layer of skin.

Norma K.
posted over 2 years ago


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