Troubles with Tony’s Napoletana dough!


Hi, guys!
Here’s the problem: yesterday I’ve made Tony’s Napoletana dough like it is in the book (with 1,5% fresh yeasts) and today, after 22 hours of refrigerating I’ve got overfermented dough... It’s way too sticky and bubbly! It is pretty hard to work with. Guess, that tomorrow I’ll have to throw it away.
Does anyone know what is the problem? Is there a typo in the book (too much yeasts)?
Much appreciated for any help!

P.S.
BPC:
100% flour (Caputo Rossa with 13% protein, W 340).
62% cold water
20% poolish
1,5% fresh yeasts
3% salt

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Giorgio O.
posted 11 months ago

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Hi Giorgio: Should be .5% yeast, 2% salt. What page are you reading?

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Maria .
posted 11 months ago


Actually, Giorgio, if you're using fresh yeast, you could do what PB does and triple whatever the .5% number is. For example on page 187, the yeast is 2.3 grams for dry (.5%) that is then converted to 7 grams fresh (3x the dry).

Also, you can re-ball the dough and set it out on your counter to rise again before using it. It will be fine. No sense in throwing it out.

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Maria .
posted 11 months ago

Thank you very much, Maria, hope re-balling will help. By the way, it seems that I’m an idiot... The recipe for Napoletana dough says to use 0.5% fresh yeast. My bad, sorry :)

- Giorgio   11 months ago


I've just bought the PB, and after making pizza dough from various internet recipes the last 6 months i am kinda curious about the 7 grams of yeast in the napoletana dough.. i think it is a lot of yeast for the amount of dough when using a starter.

and i can't find the x3 example when using dry yeast\fresh yeast.
the amount of yeast on page 302 is 0,5% (dry yeast or fresh yeast?)

and my dough made with poolish starter and 7 grams of fresh yeast is growing out of the box soon..large and bubbly.

Benny H.
posted 8 months ago

Hey, Benny!
Tony’s Napoletana dough recipe is all about fresh yeast. You know, this actually works. I’ve tested several variations for commercial use and Tony’s appeared to work the best.
If you’re interested, I make my dough like this:
100% flour Caputo Rossa (330-390 strength)
62% cold water (pH 6-7)
20% Poolish starter
2.5% sea salt
0.25% fresh yeast
0.5% liquid malt extract
It has gorgeous results!

- Giorgio   8 months ago

Hey, Giorgio :)

The way you make your dough, i am more familiar with. The amount of yeast 0,25% is closer to what i have made before. Tony's recipe is 1.5% of fresh yeast or 0.5% dry yeast, i don't have the book in front of me so apologize for any error. And in the percent tabel is says 0.5% yeast.
Any thoughts about the 1.5% fresh yeast in the recipe from the book?

- Benny   8 months ago

I guess, there’s definitely a typo in the book about that 1.5% yeast. 0.5 looks more real, but still it’s way too much. I guess, that 1.5% fresh yeast might work with home oven, but the dough made this way for commercial use gets insanely sticky, bubbly and overfermented. As a result, it burns in the oven (if you are lucky enough to put it there and not to tear it))

- Giorgio   8 months ago


Hi guys!
Why do u use yeast at all when using a starter ? i asked a professional baker and he said that the poolish replaces the yeast - thats a starter there for ?
just curious - because my dough without any yeast (just 20% starter) is really nice ..
but u know always wanna improve ;)
thanks!

Robert U.
posted 7 months ago

Thank you, Robert!
You know, when I was writing this post, I didn’t know that the starter replaces fresh yeast. Tony’s book says to use yeast in both situations: when making a starter and when making a dough. A couple of weeks ago I was lucky to read “The elements of pizza” by Ken Forkish, where he describes the way the bakers make their dough, where fresh yeast is replaced by the starter or levain. And the last time I made my dough without any yeast, I got perfect results :)

- Giorgio   7 months ago


No yeast, levain culture only.
Electric pizza oven, Caputo Rossa, 48 hours of fermentation, a bit sour taste (which is not that cool)

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Giorgio O.
posted 7 months ago


hi Giorgio !
Cool that is what i thought! dont know why Tony recommends additional yeast at all... but u know thats part of the great mystery pizza is all about! everyone has their slightly own interpretations - but i am sure tony knows a hell lot more than us! but i also get great results with just starter so i will stick to that finally!
how much starter did u use that it tasted quite sour ? i know ken forkish recommends 50% which i instinctivly feel is way too much !
i am at 20% but will 30% this week for 24h bulk fermentation at 15C (cellar) and 3-4 hours ball proof at room temp..
nice greetings !

Robert U.
posted 7 months ago

Damn true!) I bet every great and famous pizzeria, including those in Naples, has their own pizza dough recipe.
By the way, when I stick to Tony’s recommendations with adding yeast to both starter and final dough, I get extremely overfermented dough. It may be OK if you need that dough the same day, but its too much for longer fermentation.
My sourdough starter has 20% of levain culture, other 80% are water and flour equally. Tomorrow I’ll finally remake my levain and try the same procedure one more time. If the final dough will still be too sour, I’ll have to reduce the amount of levain in it’s starter... Anyway, the end result is awesome, I just have to experiment with the amount of wild yeast ;)
Probably it’s great to have 50% of it in artisanal bread, but pizza taster way too sour!

- Giorgio   7 months ago


yeah for sure the have all their own :) - cool i will also begin tomorrow my starter for saturday .. do you have insta ? would like to connect with u ;) cheers from Austria!

Robert U.
posted 7 months ago

Yup) I’m ilgranopizza in instagram. Just leave any message, I’ll know it’s you)
Would love to stay in touch!

- Giorgio   7 months ago


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