Yeast experiment


I decided to experiment using Munton's ale yeast. I put together two identical starters on Wednesday night with the yeast being the only variable. One used the ale yeast and the other used Red Star active dry yeast. I let them sit on the counter overnight then fed each one with more flour and water in the same proportions they were made with. No additional yeast was added. I then put them in the refrigerator overnight. The starter with Munton's ale yeast is on the right. This is the result. It is difficult to tell in the picture but there is a definite difference. My unscientific estimate is that the ale yeast version is about 25% bulkier with larger, more aggressive bubbles. It also has a "deeper", more pleasing (to me) smell. I used both in identical doughs tonight and will cook them in grandma style pizzas Sunday.

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Chuck W.
posted about 2 years ago

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Looks intriguing! But...
Where did you get this yeast?
It sounds like this is a brewer's yeast, not a baker's yeast. Is that true?
What is a grandma style pizza?

Let us know how your pizzas turn out!

Jim Kerr
posted about 2 years ago


Yes, it is a brewers yeast that I bought on Amazon. Whether or not this is true or not, I don't know but someone told me that a local pizzeria used to use brewers yeast so I figured I would try it. I also have some Champaign yeast that I am going to try one of these days. A grandma style pizza is basically in the style of what an Italian grandmother would make. Always in a sheet pan, typically thinner than a Sicilian. All the ones I have ever seen, including my wife's grandmother's, are cheese on bottom, sauce on top. It is pretty rare here on the west coast but I hear it is getting popular at pizza places in the northeast. For some reason I am fascinated by the style. Maybe it is because my wife's grandmother's recipe (made by my wife's aunt) was the first time I had ever experienced a homemade pizza or maybe it is just because it's good. Not sure.

Chuck W.
posted about 2 years ago

Does your recipe differ significantly from the one in Tony's book? If so, how? I had never enjoyed thick crust pizza until I made the recipe from the "Bible" for Sicilian pizza with good flour. It is delicious and has me thinking about making the Grandma style for which he has a recipe.

- Ken   about 2 years ago


I am basically using the master dough recipe with a poolish starter although I think the book recommends the Sicilian style dough. I also use 25 ounces for a 12x18 pan which I think is a little less than the book calls for if I remember correctly. I like it just a little thinner but you can't go wrong with any recipe from the book. I am also experimenting with All Trumps flour this time. Working great so far. I made both doughs into 25 ounce balls today and the rise between the two yeasts appears to be about even at this point.

Chuck W.
posted about 2 years ago


Very interesting....I am a homebrewer my self.....can't wait to hear the results from your experiment. There are a variety of beer yeast, I have never used the Mutons Ale yeast, so I am not for sure what kind of flavor profile that yeast have....but there are several yeast strains out there, some are neutural in their flavors, some more fruiter flavors.....but I do know if you are using a ale yeast, the ideal temp for fermenting ales is anywhere from 60 to 70 degrees.......good luck with the experiment and looking forward to the results!

Mark S.
posted about 2 years ago


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